Agfa Optima 335 Sensor (Taken with a Nikon F4 + Ilford Delta 100)

I can’t quite remember where I saw this camera mentioned but I do remember being struck so much by its design that I put a £10 bid on eBay almost immediately for this camera during summer of last year. I put a roll through it in 2016 and it didn’t come out very good. I’d mainly been taking pictures of mates at a party and I was clearly being too optimistic about the light levels. That roll at least proved the camera worked and the few shots that came out well did show nice rendering of colour. 

Fast forward a year during which this camera has been sat on my shelf collecting dust I decided to take it with me to a recent trip to the Big Apple to try my hand at some street photography.

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

It was a bright sunny and incredibly hot day as I walked down from Columbus Circle to 34th street. The camera is so compact and light I just had it held in my hand all the time. This is pretty much the simplest camera possible; the focus is via 3 zones that snap into place (although it is possible to leave the focus in between if you want, and there is a distance scale underneath the lens barrel  – but in reality you’re not likely to use that), the aperture and shutter speed are automatically selected by the camera with no manual override. On the top of the camera there is a huge red button to fire the shutter on the top of the wind on crank thats just asking to be pressed and a small knob to change the crank from advance to return.

I was pretty snap happy, but the light was brilliant, and the shadows promising for some good contrast out of the TMax film. I was interested how the little f3.5 lens would hold up and how good the camera would be at getting a decent exposure. After developing the roll – wow  – I was completely surprised. Most shots were correctly exposed and the lens was really sharp. Sure black and white film has tons of latitude and the availability of light meant the aperture was probably f16 for most of these shots, but still, I was still surprised.

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

This isn’t a 100% positive review however. Upon finishing the roll I went to rewind the film. You do this by rotating a knob to change the crank lever from advance to rewind. After a while the crank seemed to become ineffective. Without really thinking I presumed the film as completely rewound so opened the back. Error. It turns out the gear on the crank must have disengaged somehow. I closed the back on the camera as quickly as I could, then decided to put the camera in a darkbag and then manually wind back the film there by hand.  Luckily the design of the camera came to the rescue. The exposed film is wound on into a little covered section in the camera, so opening the back only ruined 2 images. It seems like great design to alleviate the issue of prematurely opening the back. We’ll see with my next roll how the rewind goes.

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (London, 2017)

Agfa Optima 335 + Kodak TMax 400 (NYC, 2017)

So to sum up – this camera not only looks incredible, but is very well designed from a functional perspective, and appears to perform very well to my eye. For street photography I think its great in looking inconspicuous. Finally, with some P&S film camera’s valuations soaring, this seems to be a really good cheap option to consider. If you’re looking for more control like aperture selection then keep a look out for the higher spec models in this line from AGFA like the 1535 (although I’ve never seen one on eBay UK). You can read more about this camera on the links below:

http://www.camera.portraits.srv2.com/optimasensor.htm 

http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Agfa_Optima_335_Electronic_Sensor